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correspondents, kristen welker and michael isikoff michael? >> what we learned last night, general allen, the u.s. commander in afghanistan has been implicated in this because of 20,000 to 30,000 documents exchanged with jill kelley. the tampa associatite who triggered this investigation when she complained about those menacing e-mails that she had been getting from an anonymous sourt who turned out to be paula broadwell, the woman who was having the affair with cia director david petraeus. what we were being told that the original e-mails, these anonymous e-mails from broadwell to kelley did not initially specifically reference petraeus, it talked about her, kelley's relationship with other generals at the u.s. central command. and southern command, suggesting that she was having an inappropriate relationship with them, that she ought to watch it and cut it out, as described to me from a source. we know that general allen who's now the center of this was the deputy command at central command until 2010. so, by implication, we can assume from the beginning, at least when paula broadwell began sen
impact on his testimony? he said no. >> but the focus of the hearing was the deadly attack of the u.s. consulate in benghazi and congressman dutch ruppersberger saying the former cia director made it clear there was terrorist involvement. >> he reinforced the fact that initially, the first 24 hours, he felt at that point or the cia felt at that point that this was a protest as a result of what happened with the film with egypt. he clarified that after more information came in, there was not a protest. >> general petraeus' testimony comes today the morning after cia acting director michael morell and james clapper the director of national int intelligence went before members of congress in two other hearings and hours after attorney general eric holder defended the decision not to bring members of congress into the loop sooner. >> we follow the facts. we do not share outside the justice department, outside the fbi the facts of ongoing investigations. we made the determination as we were going through the matter that there was not a threat to national security. >> let's jump right in an
are watching some major developments at the u.s. supreme court where the nine justices are behind closed doors considering whether to take up cases that will impact same-sex marriage in america. ten marriage equality cases are on the high court's menu. eight of them deal with the federal defense of marriage act, or doma. joining me now is chris geidner. the man who knows the supreme court inside and out, pete williams. pete, good to have you with us. break it down. which cases are we talking about, and how quickly might we find out whether they will move forward? >> reporter: well, if they're going to take any of these cases, thomas, it's very likely we'll find out this afternoon. and i think the most likely event here is that they will grant one of the cases that challenges the federal defense of marriage act. passed in 1966 by congress signed by president clinton, it defines marriage as for federal law purposes as only the legal union of one man and one woman. now, the practical effect of that is that in the nine states that now grant or soon will grant same-sex couples the legal right to ge
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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